Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles
Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles - Dedicated to Those Who Served
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Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles now has a large U.S.S. Lexington Exhibit documenting the valiant history of one of America's aircraft carriers. The ship entered service in 1928 and was assigned to the Pacific Fleet for her entire career. U.S.S. Lexington was sunk in May 1942 during the Battle of the Coral Sea.

U.S.S. Lexington Display
U.S.S. Lexington Display

The ship participated in the unsuccessful search for Amelia Earhart.

U.S.S. Lexington Display

USS Lexington, a 33,000-ton aircraft carrier, was converted while under construction from the battle cruiser of the same name. Built at Quincy, Massachusetts, and commissioned in December 1927, Lexington was one of the U.S. Navy's first two aircraft carriers that were large and fast enough to be capable of serious fleet operations. During the late 1920s, through the 1930s and into the early 1940s, she took an active part in the development of carrier techniques, fleet doctrine and in the operational training of a generation of Naval Aviators.

Lexington was in the Pacific when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor and took part in the U.S. Navy's first wartime operation, the abortive attempt in December 1941 to relieve Wake Island. In February and March 1942, she raided Japanese positions in the southwestern Pacific, then returned to Pearl Harbor for a brief overhaul and removal of her eight-inch guns.

In early May, Lexington returned to the South Pacific in time to join USS Yorktown (CV-5) in successfully countering the Japanese offensive in the Coral Sea. On 7 and 8 May 1942 her planes helped sink the small Japanese aircraft carrier Shoho and participated in attacks on the large carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku. In turn, however, she was the target of Japanese carrier planes and received two torpedo and three bomb hits. Though initial damage control efforts appeared to be successful, she was racked by gasoline explosions in the early afternoon of 8 May. When the fires raged out of control, Lexington was abandoned by her crew and scuttled, the first U.S. aircraft carrier to be lost in World War II.

Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles - Dedicated to Those Who Served

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Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles
606 Heartland Road
Lexington, Nebraska 68850
308-324-6329

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